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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
." >> not reaching out aggressively enough like bill clinton, lbj, ronald reagan did. and also it was critical the first four years about him not reaching out enough to the business community. he didn't understand the business community, according to ceos who supported him for four years. but steve rattner, he's made a pretty dramatic shift since the election, and certainly i salute him for doing this, he actually is very engaged with the business community. and i'm not hearing the sort of things from top ceos and business leaders today that i heard the first four years. maybe -- maybe he's leaning in here and trying to rebuild a relationship with some of these people who supported him in '08. >> and i think it goes both ways. i think the business community views this deficit thing as the biggest problem that we can solve that we need to solve. there's something called a campaign to fix the debt, which i'm on the steering committee, 120 leading ceos from everything from general electric to jpmorgan on down. really committed to doing something and accepting the idea that revenues have to go up,
this because you remember, we went through this with newt. you know, bill clinton would push newt only so far, and then the conservatives in the caucus like myself and matt salmon, steve largent and others would say we're not doing a deal. we will take this place down. we're not doing a deal. and then newt would call bill clinton up and say, you're pushing me too far. you've got to work with me here. the same thing's happening right now with boehner. >> with boehner. >> the republican -- and when you start stripping people of committee -- committee seats, war breaks out and it gets really -- it happened with us. it's about to happen here. he's got to realize that boehner is his partner. >> it feels like we're at a really critical moment here with respect to boehner. and he can choose one of two paths. he could choose the recalcitrant path, which is perfectly possible, or he can say to himself, okay, i need to build a coalition for the purposes of this fiscal cliff deal. that includes house democrats. and how do i go about doing that without totally alienating the base of my party? and i'm ver
be -- if you raise the rates up to the clinton levels for the top two percent you make 82 billion a year. that is not enough to close the gap . washington post on the editorial page. we looked at what the president suggested and republicans suggested it is nice that they are starting to talk. but the numbers have to be a lot bigger . you need real tax reform. >> gretchen: he won the election with that argument. >> steve: republicans won the congress with their argument that they didn't want to raise the rates. >> brian: if you want to know what the president things. you can go flip channels and find out about the briefing and the president's stance on taxes and goal with the economy and maybe what he will say in the inauguration. look who was invited to the white house >> chris: who was left to run msnbc. >> happy and ed and arihanna huffington. i don't know if the white house released the fact. but someone from the blog sites saw it. and so wait a minute what is going on. yeah, we were invited for not a strategy but just to explain. >> gretchen: i don't know why anybody. >> brian: five
your tax system is. and it's pretty low now. you know compare it to the clinton era rates, which is kind of all we're talking about, right? going back to the clinton era rate of 39% -- >> is it about fairness? or is it about lessening the deficit? because it doesn't really do a whole lot for the debt or deficit over ten years. >> well, it's about fairness, but it's also about what are the better options? given that the wealthy are really skating by these days. and so how do you collect more revenue from them? and all the various ideas about, well, you cap this deduction, and cap that deduction. there are not only political constituencies that will fight tooth and claw on every deducti deduction, there are some reasons, fairly good reasons why you would want to think twice. you know, are you going to go after home mortgage deduction at a time when the housing industry is trying to get its feet? are you going to go after the exemption on taxation for health insurance? i mean, that's the biggest one, actually. that's like $250 billion a year. but i don't think anybody wants to dive
and secretary of state clinton, that if there was movement of any chemical weapons of mass destruction, movement -- now, as i listen to what you're saying, there hasn't been movement. it looks like they're getting ready where they are, but they haven't moved yet, so maybe they haven't violated the red line exactly. >> that's right, larry. they've got everything in place to do that. but what are the possibilities here? u.s. military officials say it would be very difficult to target certain areas. there are possibilities if they're going to load them on the planes. they could use cruise missiles to attack airstrips, for example. they can't blow up the weapons sites themselves, otherwise then the deadly gases could be spread among the public and kill thousands. the only other option according to some people that i've been talking to over the past couple of days is possibly take those cruise missiles and aim them not only at the airport strips, but at regime targets. even perhaps president assad himself. but so far, we haven't gotten there, the big question is can the u.s. react quickly enough if s
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)